Greenhouse Production of Vegetables and Flowers

img249  Sun Valley Hydroponics Fabens Texas. This greenhouse facility was 5 acres under glass, producing tomato and cucumbers hydroponically. I was employed here from 1976-1978 as horticulturist and grower, handling the production of both cucumber and tomato crops. greenhouse3  One set of photos is a hydroponic greenhouse production facility called Sun Valley Hydroponics in Fabens, Texas. The operation was a five acre greenhouse complex, growing plants by the hydroponic sand culture method. The photos of flowers was the El Cid Greenhouse operation in Tome, New Mexico. El Cid was a flower, bedding plant and foliage plant greenhouse production facility. The two facilities used hydroponic solutions to fertilize plants. Jim Shaffner was the horticulturist and grower for both facilities. greenhouse1  Sun Valley Hydroponics Fabens, Texas. Cucumber plants in a sand media being feed a hydroponic solution of fertilizer img228  Cucumber plant in full bloom img225  Fully ripe cucumbers ready for harvest. img227  Fully ripe cucumbers ready for harvest.
greenhouse5  Sun Valley Hydroponics Fabens, Texas. Cucumber plants in a sand media being feed a hydroponic solution of fertilizer. These plants would grow at least two inches a day and required constant attention to prune suckers and wrap a single stem around  a string. The string was suspended from the top of the greenhouse.. Each plant was maintained as a single stem plant. img219  Sun Valley Hydroponics Fabens, Texas. Cucumber plants in a sand media being feed a hydroponic solution of fertilizer. These plants would grow at least two inches a day and required constant attention to prune suckers and wrap a single stem around  a string. The string was suspended from the top of the greenhouse.. Each plant was maintained as a single stem plant. img238  Employee pruning cucumber plants to a single stem. The single stem plant was wound around a string that was suspended from the top of the green greenhouse. img222  Sun Valley Hydroponics Fabens, Texas. Cucumber plants in a sand media being feed a hydroponic solution of fertilizer. These plants would grow at least two inches a day and required constant attention to prune suckers and wrap a single stem around  a string. The string was suspended from the top of the greenhouse.. Each plant was maintained as a single stem plant. img233  Sun Valley Hydroponics Fabens, Texas. Cucumber plants in a sand media being feed a hydroponic solution of fertilizer. These plants would grow at least two inches a day and required constant attention to prune suckers and wrap a single stem around  a string. The string was suspended from the top of the greenhouse.. Each plant was maintained as a single stem plant. img239  Sun Valley Hydroponics Fabens, Texas. Cucumber plants in a sand media being feed a hydroponic solution of fertilizer. These plants would grow at least two inches a day and required constant attention to prune suckers and wrap a single stem around  a string. The string was suspended from the top of the greenhouse.. Each plant was maintained as a single stem plant.
greenhouse6  Tomato cluster nearing time to pick off the vine. greenhouse8  Young tomato plants in pure sand being fed a hydroponic solution of fertilizer greenhouse2  Tomato plants in sand culture nearing maturity. greenhouse10  Cucumbers packed and ready for shipment to market img230  Hydroponic tomatoes packed and ready for shipment. img234  Radish plants grown hydroponically.
img252  Bedding plants ready for shipment  to market. Sun Valley Hydronics. img253  Bedding plants ready for shipment  to market. Sun Valley Hydronics. img251  Potted mums nearing their bloom cycle. The wires above the plants was used to cover the plants with black plack plastic to restrict light. img250  Mary and another employee transplanting bedding planrs. img240  Bedding plants ready for shipment. img236  Newly transplanted bedding plants.
img237  Newly transplanted bedding plants. img224  A 3/4 acre greenhouse cleaned and ready for the next crop.  Strings are used to tie tomato and cucumber plants to overhead wires. img244  Two 500 gallon mixing tanks for hydroponic fertilizer solutions.  Brass, Smith proportioner injects fertilizer into the water line at a 100:1 rate. img245  50,000 gallon water tank for treated water for the Sun Valley Hydroponic Greenhouse operation. The desalanization ( reverse osmosis) equipment was inside the building next to the water tank. img247  The desalanization (reverse osmosis) equipment. The control system for removing mineral from the very hard water. img246  The desalanization (reverse osmosis) equipment. The control system for removing mineral from the very hard water. The tubular devices were pressurized to 700 psi to remove minerals from the water. The water had to be acidified for the reverse osmosis to work correctly.
img243  The Sun Valley Hydroponic greenhouse complex. img242  The Sun Valley Hydroponic greenhouse complex. img254  Jimmy Shaffner in the background  El Cid Greenhouse 1978-1981 greenhouse13  El Cid Greenhouse in Tome, new Mexico.  Mum crop ready for shipment. 1978-1981 img259  Mum Crop ready for shipment El Cid Greenhouse. img258  Mum Crop ready for shipment El Cid Greenhouse.
img257  Mum Crop ready for shipment El Cid Greenhouse. img256  Mum Crop ready for shipment El Cid Greenhouse. img255  Mum Crop ready for shipment El Cid Greenhouse. img260  Begonia hanging baskets ready for shipment. img261  El Cid Greenhouse in Tome, New Mexico.  Mum crop nearly ready for shipment. 1978-1981 img272  Gremin Gardens Tucumcari, NM. A hydroponic tomato greenhouse growing operation. 1974-1976. The plants were grown in pure sand and fed a hydroponic solution every day.  These 2 photos were taken after a disastrous wind storm ripped the plastic from the greenhouse. After the wind storm the tomato crop was exposed to the elements which resulted in a crop failure and ultimate permanent shut down of the facility. The greenhouse was disassembled and sold to El Cid Greenhouse in Tome, NM. Dick Carmichael the original owner of Gremlin Gardens moved to Colorado. Jim Shaffner his partner in the operation was employed a couple years later at El Cid Greenhouse.
img273  Gremin Gardens Tucumcari, NM. A hydroponic tomato greenhouse growing operation 1974-1976. The operation failed because of two serious design flaws. One problem was the  design  of the attachment point for the plastic roof covering  which would  come loose during a severe wind storm. The plastic blew off more than once which exposed the plants to the elements. The other problem was the equipment that was used to inject fertilizer into the water system to feed plants was of the wrong design which caused the sand to form large chunks of insoluable mineral deposits. The fertilizer injection system that was used was 180:1 which was far to concentrated and caused fertilizer compounds to percipitate out solution in the mixing tanks. The absolute maximum concentration should have been 100:1 not 180:1. img263  Jim Shaffner operating a loader on his first job for his own landscaping business. img264  Jimmy Shaffner helping his dad in his landscaping business. img268  Tulip crop at New Mexico University img267  Marion Shaffner, my mother in spring 1983. Mom is standing in front of the newly finished rock landscape. The tulip flower bed was the first time tulips were  planted at New Mexico Tech. I was hired in 1981 as Director of Facilities Management. img266  The tulip flower bed was the first time tulips were planted at New Mexico Tech. I was hired in 1981 as I was hired in 1981 as Director of Facilities Management.
img265  The tulip flower bed was the first time tulips were  planted at New Mexico Tech. I was hired in 1981 as the I was hired in 1981 as Director of Facilities Management. img271 img270.1